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Lesson 8: Sixteen Mātrā Tīntāl

 

Carrying off from the two larger methods discussed in Lesson 7, the rhythmic cycle shown at Lesson 7 is presented here formally. This rhythmic cycle is known as tīntāl. Tīntāl literally means “three claps.” (the reason why it’s called three claps is found in the Lesson E 2). This cycle is occasionally heard in classical bhajans and rarely in kirtans. However, this cycle is relatively simple that it serves as a basis on approaching more complex cycles. This is a common classical tāla used in tabla. Some Bengali musicians will refer to this as “tritāla.” “Tritāla” is another similar sixteen mātrā tāla, but it is not necessarily the same as tīntāl.

 

Structure-wise, tīntāl contains sixteen mātrās. The tāla divisions are 4+4+4+4.

 

Here is the theka of tīntāl. Remember in Lesson 7, the theka has the tāla numbers, mātrā numbers, and bols. Therefore, here is the official theka of tīntāl.

 

X

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

dhā

dhin

dhin

dhā

dhā

dhin

dhin

dhā

dhā

ti

ti

dhin

dhin

dhā

 

This tāla is considered to be a symmetrical tāla. Symmetrical tāla refers to tālas that have identical halves on the dāyān side only. They don’t necessarily have to perfectly symmetrical. The bāyā in one or the other half has to change somewhat. If it doesn’t, then it would be a four mātrā tāla (repetition of “dhā dhin dhin dhā” without distinction of what mātrā number.)

 

This lesson will also gauge you on your ability to learn new things. Based on the bol and vibhāg method shown in Lesson 7, you may use whichever one is the most helpful in your learning. You may also play along with the following clip.

 

 

KARTAL ACCOMPANIMENT:

As indicated with the elementary kirtana rhythm in Lesson 6, kartal use is the background of bhajans and kirtans. The typical kartal cycle fits very well here. (Remember, it’s a four beat cycle, NOT a three beat cycle!!!). See how the open (O) kartal sound falls at the start of each vibhāg.

 

O = open C = closed

 

X

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

dhā

dhin

dhin

dhā

dhā

dhin

dhin

dhā

dhā

ti

ti

dhin

dhin

dhā

O

-

C

C

O

-

C

C

O

-

C

C

O

-

C

C

 

 

ACCOMPANIMENT

 

Here is a practice loop of the well known chant, “oḿ namo bhagavate vasudevāya” in Raga Malkauns. Play along with the clip and get an idea of the time and feel of this rhythmic cycle.

 

 

Once you feel comfortable with approaching tīntāl and playing it comfortably, you may proceed to the one of the most diverse rhythmic cycles in Lesson 9, through kaherva tāla.

 

 

VIDEOS:

 

·VIDEO CLIP 8: Sixteen Mātrā Tīntāl

 

UPDATED: August 17, 2017