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Lesson 10 B: Prabhupāda/Dasapahira Prakārs 3 and 4

 

Like Lesson 10 A, this lesson will talk about two more prakārs of Prabhupāda tāla. Unlike the first two prakārs, these two prakārs are a little more challenging.

 

 

PRAKĀR 3

 

This format resembles a true North Indian rendition of Prabhupāda tāla. In practice, this form is not widely used. However, this rhythmic cycle allows proper transition between open and closed bols, as well as makes good practice of the phrase “ti ra ki ti.” This phrase will be used throughout our study of mridanga. This rhythmic cycle is also analogous to the more ancient Viśva Vandita tāla.

 

The cycle is as follows:

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

dhā

ti

ra

ki

ti

ti

ra

ki

ti

ka

ti

ra

ki

ti

dhā

dhin

dhā

dhin

dhā

 

 

Beats 2 and 3, as well as 6 and 7, and 10 and 11 contain “ti ra ki ti.” This phrase is a very common and fundamental phrase in North Indian and some Bengali rhythmic cycles. This is why this was studied in Lesson 5. Since there are way too many bols, the best way to study this is by vibhāg breakdown.

 

 

Part 1: dhā trkt tā

Part 2: tā trkt tā

Part 3: ka trkt dhā

Part 4: dhin dhā dhin dhā

 

After mastering all four portions, fuse them together and result in a full cycle.

 

Once you are able to pick up the cycle, continuously practice Prabhupāda tāla in a chain.

 

 

This is Prakār 3 as a full cycle plays repeatedly.

 

PRAKĀR 4

 

The last one, the Bengali form, is perhaps the most difficult one. When students study the khol in gurukulas, they study Dasapahirā tāla as the following theka.

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

dhin

 

ti

uru

ti

ti

 

ki

 

ki

ti

dhā

ghi

dhā

ghi

dhā

 

The key distinctive feature is the use of the bol “uru” in bol 4. Uru is a Bengali bol that describes three successive strikes on the dayan. Bengali tradition tends to use simpler words to describe a succession of several bols.

 

The bol “uru” is the same as “ti tā ti.”* So one can replace “uru” with the bols “ti tā ti”.

 

à I’ve been informed by other khol instructors who studied the Bengali technique that bols like “uru” have the components played as quickly as possible. In other words, you don’t time the subcomponents “ti tā ti”. You simply those three as fast as you can. (Similar to the tabla “tra” and “kra” bols)

 

BENGALI FORM

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

dhei

 

uru

te

te

 

khi

 

khi

ne

dhā

ghi

dhā

ghi

dhā

 

The Bengali technique uses bol techniques which are different from that of North Indian technique. In addition, the names of the bols are different too. For example, “dhei” is the Bengali rendition of “dhin.” “Ne” is equivalent to “ti.” Tā, dhā, and ghi are open bols, just like their North Indian counterparts, however the technique for “tā” is different. Since this course is a North Indian course, please refer to the video by Abhijit below to learn about Dasapahira tāla.

 

·VIDEO CLIP 10 – 1: Prabhupāda Tāla Prakārs 3 and 4

·VIDEO CLIP: Abhijit teaches how to play Dasapahira Tāla

 

 

UPDATED: October 14, 2017